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Georgia Peach
November 2009 Week 2
Burrito Deluxe
Audio CD
(August 1, 2002)
Original Release Date: August 1, 2002
Number of Discs: 1
Label: Lamon Records


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TRACK LISTING
1. Wheels
2. Secret Of Life
3. Cash On The Barrel Head
4. Hickory Wind
5. Bluest Brown Eyes
6. She's Still The Queen
7. Street's Of Baltimore
8. Call It Love
9. Christine's Tune
10. Old Memories
11. She Once Lived Here
12. Louisiana
13. Feels Like A Heartache
14. G.P.
In the thirty-plus years that bridge Gram Parsons' departure from the Burrito Brothers and the release of Georgia Peach, tributes to the late cosmic country pioneer seemed to sprout with each new season. This one stands out for its reunion of Burrito alumni and inclusion of younger acolytes. The result is a mixture of weathered nostalgia and fresh but reverent spirit, all of which illustrates just how distinctive this movement once was. By modern standards, the playing here is a little stiff; the pedal steel glissandi of "Sneaky" Pete Kleinow are almost arthritic, compared with the mercurial virtuosity of his many
protégés. But the old master's textural sweetenings, which faintly betray their psychedelic heritage, make the case that faster and slicker doesn't necessarily mean better. That point is driven home on "Hickory Wind," which the brilliant Garth Hudson animates with organic, tactile keyboard fills that no one else could possibly have conceived, especially in this era of frozen samples and preset sounds. These details hark toward a more subtle quality that wafts throughout Georgia Peach, something that feels the way a blend of incense and mesquite might have smelled one night long ago at the Armadillo World Headquarters or outside the Palomino in L.A. In the words and rhythm of "Wheels," and even in "G.P.," the somewhat maudlin Parsons eulogy that concludes the album, Georgia Peach leaves us at the end of the trail once blazed by the Burritos and their brethren, surrounded by ghosts and empty space, far from the gridlock where mainstream country music now sits and waits. 
By Robert L. Doerschuk, All Music Guide